Parsons Selected to Lead I-69 Ohio River Crossing Review

Gray & Pape, Inc., is pleased to be part of the professional services team led by Parsons Transportation Group, Inc. to complete the preliminary design and the environmental review for the I-69 Ohio River Crossing project. The selection of the Parsons team was recently announced by the Indiana Department of Transportation and Kentucky Transportation Cabinet I-69 Ohio River Crossing Review. For more than 10 years, Gray & Pape has served as the lead archaeological consultant for the 141–mile I-69 project from Evansville to Indianapolis, Indiana. The firm reviewed the cultural resource work completed by other consultants, conducted multiple Phase I archaeological surveys totaling several thousand acres, completed Phase II investigations for several archaeological sites in Sections 1 through 5, and the Phase III mitigation of one site in Section 4. Gray & Pape also provided supporting work for the assembly of complex coordination documents, including several MOAs, the DEIS, and the FEIS for each section. The company is currently engaged in completing the Phase 1a archaeological surveys for the last segment in Section 6. Gray & Pape looks forward to working on the Parsons team in completing Ohio River Crossing project and I-69 in Indiana.

Two Projects Approved for Nomination to National Register of Historic Places

The Ohio Historic Site Preservation Advisory Board approved 12 proposed Ohio nominations to the National Register of Historic Places. Among these were the Joseph and Cecilia Bappert House in Cincinnati and Engine House No. 6 in Columbus.

Bappert House muralThe Joseph and Cecilia Bappert House is an outstanding local example of a single-family Tudor Revival residence built as part of an early-20th century subdivision for a prominent Cincinnati businessman. It’s also significant for featuring original artwork by well-known Cincinnati artist, Mathias Noheimer. Built in around 1936, the two-story Tudor-Revival residence exhibits numerous Tudor Revival architectural details, including an asymmetrical design, original leaded-glass casement windows throughout the house, half timbering on the façade, a central tower marking the front entrance. Additionally, the house retains the original and well-preserved, hand-painted wall murals by artist Mathias Noheimer. The Flemish and Germanic Renaissance artistry of the murals correlate to the strong German heritage of Cincinnati. The Bappert House retains a high degree of integrity with its setting little changed and with few alterations on both the exterior and interior.

 

Engine HouseBuilt in 1892, Engine House No. 6 is a two story, Romanesque Revival style building constructed of brick and limestone, located on the northeast corner of W. Broad St. and North Mill St. in the East Franklinton neighborhood in Columbus. It’s significant for its association with the history of firefighting provided by the City of Columbus. Completed in 1892, Engine House No. 6 is a two story, Romanesque Revival style building constructed of brick and limestone designed by architect John Flynn and built by contractor, D. Spencer & Sons. Engine House No. 6 is one of the few remaining Columbus engine houses built during the late nineteenth century, a period of considerable growth for Columbus resulting in changes in the way the city dealt with fighting fires. As the city extended its water mains further outward during this period of growth, water pressure declined, as the pumps at the municipal water supply were insufficient to maintain pressure for such great distances. In order to effectively fight fires in any part of the city, steam powered pumping engines, which could significantly increase pressure from the city’s fire hydrants were put into use by the fire department. Engine House No. 6 was one of about 12 engine houses that was either newly built, as is the case with Engine House No 6, or rebuilt to accommodate the larger equipment during the early-to-mid 1890s.

To learn more, visit https://www.ohiohistory.org/…/june…/ohspab-meeting-june-2016

World Heritage Ohio Meets in Columbus

Kevin Pape, fellow members of Ohio’s World Heritage Steering Committee and key stakeholders convened at the Ohio History Center for a strategic planning session to advance the nomination of the Hopewell Ceremonial Earthworks. The planning session was facilitated by Marion Werkheiser, Cultural Heritage Partners.

Gray & Pape Wins 2016 Boone County Preservation Project Award

Metal detector reconnaissance
Metal detector reconnaissance
Ground Penetrating Radar
Ground Penetrating Radar
Craig-Ewalt Cemetery
Craig-Ewalt Cemetery
Craig-Ewalt House
Craig-Ewalt House

In recognition of the firm’s April 2014 archaeological work at the Craig-Ewalt site, the Boone County Historic Preservation Review Board selected Gray & Pape to receive the Preservation Project award.

In cooperation with the Boone County Public Library, the Boone County Historic Preservation Review Board, and the Rabbit Hash Historical Society, Gray & Pape conducted an archaeological and architectural assessment of the Craig-Ewalt farmstead and cemetery in the East Bend area of Boone County, KY. This research was conducted as a “rescue archaeology” effort to document the site prior to removal of the log house and subsequent grading and contouring of the landscape. The principal focus of this effort was to document the log house prior to disassembly; identify any intact subsurface archaeological deposits; and delineate the boundaries of the Craig Cemetery. The log Craig-Ewalt House was disassembled in late April 2015, and moved to the farm of Butch and Mary Ann Wainscott in Petersburg, KY

Archaeological, archival, and architectural analyses indicate that the Craig-Ewalt House was originally constructed approximately one-half mile to the south of its location beside Beaver Road during the mid-1840s, by William Ewalt. By 1879, the house was occupied by Charles Craig, and appears to have been disassembled and moved to its location on the south side of Beaver Road shortly after publication of D. J. Lake’s (1883) Boone County Atlas. Additionally, the Craig Cemetery is located to the east of the house and a Ground-Penetrating-Radar survey identified at least nine potential interments. This family cemetery appears to have been established in 1852, with the death of Capt. John Hawkins Craig, a veteran of the Revolutionary War. However, earlier graves may be present. Additional known burials include Franklin Craig and John P. Craig; both of whom are sons of Capt. John Hawkins Craig and Sallie Snelling Craig. Historical research indicates that Sallie Snelling Craig is also buried in this cemetery.

The award will be presented at the 2016 Boone County Historic Preservation Awards Reception held on Thursday, May 12, 2016, from 6:30 to 8:00pm at the Main Branch of the Boone County Public Library on Burlington Pike.

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Gray & Pape staff who assisted with this project: Brian Mabelitini, Morgan Wampler, Donald Handshoe, Carly Meyer, Sarah Holland, Mike Striker.

Additional acknowledgements: Gray & Pape would like to thank Bridget Striker at the Boone County Public Library, Matt Becher at the Boone County Planning Commission, and Don Clare at the Rabbit Hash Historical Society for their interest and assistance with this research. We are very grateful to Mr. George Budig for allowing us to conduct this research on his property, and to Mr. Dickey Boh and Mr. Terry Sawyer for sharing their knowledge of the area. We also extend our gratitude to Scott Clark, Kaitlin Barber, and Hillary Delaney for their invaluable assistance. Special thanks to Dr. George Crothers and the University of Kentucky for use of the Ground-Penetrating-Radar (GPR) device.

Gray & Pape is Hiring

Wide-open spaces, a new challenge every day, continued investment in you and your career. Sound good? Look into joining our team. At Gray & Pape you will receive on-going investment in your professional development through continuing education, conference attendance opportunities, and the ability to pursue research based on project work. Not mention a competitive salary and benefits.

We are  looking to fill the following positions. Interested parties should submit vitae, including 3 professional references, via email to Mirna Colon, HR Manager, at mcolon@graypape.com or fax to her attention at 513.287.7703.  Gray & Pape is an equal opportunity employer:

  • Principal Investigator,Archaeology for projects in the Northern Plains; responsible for the management of archaeology to the satisfaction of client requirements and in recognition of professional and company standards. A complete job description is available upon request. Minimum qualifications: MA in Anthropology or related field and CRM project management experience. Experience with broad range of cultural resource projects strongly preferred. Must have extensive project experience in The Northern Plains and experience working with SHPO in ND and SD preferred.  Demonstrated excellence with written and verbal communication skills, and ability to effectively supervise people is important.
  • Experienced Field Director for our Providence, RI office to manage Phase I and II field projects. This position is for the 2016 field season, the estimated length of employment is April 1-October 31, 2016.  This is a temporary salaried position with the potential to become a regular full-time position.  To be considered for this position you must have a minimum of a BA/BS (MA/MS preferred) in Anthropology, Archaeology, or related field and 2 years CRM field supervisory experience. Experience in New England is a necessity.

Gray & Pape adds office, service line

Gray & Pape is excited to announce that the HRA Gray & Pape, LLC Houston Office and Marine Services Division are now wholly owned divisions of Gray & Pape, effective 1 January 2016.

We have been invested in the development of the Houston Office and Marine Services Division through our joint venture with Historical Research Associates. Bringing the Houston office and Marine Services under Gray & Pape ownership will foster greater collaboration between offices and allow us to offer our clients fully integrated services across a broad, multi-region footprint. Jim Hughey, in Houston, and Dr. Michael Tuttle, Marine Services, will continue their leadership of these business units providing heritage management services to our clients in the southeast and maritime clients across the United States.

 

Archaeologists Create 3D Model of Site

Gray & Pape archaeologists recently documented a mid-nineteenth century cellar in Pennsylvania. Along with the cellar itself, we found building materials such as bricks, nails, and window glass; household items such as fragments of cups and dishes; and other items including a gear from a pocket watch and a gunflint. The 3D model of the cellar was created by using several dozen photos to create a pointcloud, over which the photographic images themselves were laid.  

 View the 3D Model at https://skfb.ly/Kp8w

 

Project Focus – Kentuckiana Farms Site

Kentuckiana Farms Site – Scott and Fayette counties, KY
Kentuckiana Farms Site – Scott and Fayette counties, KY

Overview of project site

Kentuckiana Farms Site – Scott and Fayette counties, KY
Kentuckiana Farms Site – Scott and Fayette counties, KY

Staff prepare the site for excavation

Kentuckiana Farms Site – Scott and Fayette counties, KY
Kentuckiana Farms Site – Scott and Fayette counties, KY

Archaeologist work in excavation units. Each square in the grid represents one unit.

Kentuckiana Farms Site – Scott and Fayette counties, KY
Kentuckiana Farms Site – Scott and Fayette counties, KY

Stone pavement discovered during excavation

Kentuckiana Farms Site – Scott and Fayette counties, KY
Kentuckiana Farms Site – Scott and Fayette counties, KY

Archaeologists uncovered rock clustering at the suspected living surface level

Kentuckiana Farms Site – Scott and Fayette counties, KY
Kentuckiana Farms Site – Scott and Fayette counties, KY

Artifacts discovered during excavation.

Gray & Pape provided a suite of archaeological resource management services to the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet in support of US 25 corridor improvements in Scott and Fayette counties.

Services included Phase I assessments of selected properties, Phase II investigations of seven archaeological sites, and Phase III data recovery investigations of the Kentuckiana Farms site. During the Phase III excavation, evidence of an encampment used for seasonal hunting was uncovered. The use of this type of site outside communal villages was previously thought only to occur in post-contact societies. The discovery of this site indicates Native Americans of the area used these separate living areas in pre-contact times as well.

 

 

Project Focus – Interstate 69 Corridor

Interstate 69 Greene County, IN
Interstate 69 Greene County, IN

Beginning stage of site excavation.

Interstate 69 Greene County, IN
Interstate 69 Greene County, IN

Machinery is used to mechanically strip the site before work is done by hand.

Interstate 69 Greene County, IN
Interstate 69 Greene County, IN

Archaeologists use a trowel to conduct hand excavations at the site.

Interstate 69 Greene County, IN
Interstate 69 Greene County, IN

Archaeologists pump water from a previously excavated unit.

Interstate 69 Greene County, IN
Interstate 69 Greene County, IN

After removing dirt from the units by hand, the dirt is screened to recover potential artifacts.

Interstate 69 Greene County, IN
Interstate 69 Greene County, IN

An archaeologist records information for a test unit.

Interstate 69 Greene County, IN
Interstate 69 Greene County, IN

View of the site after multiple units have been excavated.

Interstate 69 Greene County, IN
Interstate 69 Greene County, IN

During an excavation, the site is divided into grid pattern. Each square on the grid is a separate unit.

Interstate 69 Greene County, IN
Interstate 69 Greene County, IN

These pieces of debitage are material produced while making stone tools.

For more than 10 years, Gray & Pape has served as the lead cultural resources project management consultant for the 141-mile Interstate 69 Evansville to Indianapolis project. As part of the Lochmueller team, the firm has assisted the Indiana Department of Transportation and Lochmueller to proactively identify and solve cultural resources management challenges. Responsibilities included the review of proposals, task orders, cost estimates, technical reports, scopes-of-work; oversight of field efforts; participation in consulting party process; and consolidation of all GIS data. Under this contract Gray & Pape has also conducted multiple Phase Ia surveys totaling several thousand acres, completed Phase II investigations for 10 archaeological sites in Sections 1 through 5, and the Phase III mitigation of one site in Section 4. Numerous rounds of subsurface testing for archaeological sites were completing, helping Lochmueller and INDOT identify avoidance strategies for resources identified along the corridor. As work on Section 6 is underway, the firm will continue to complete cultural resources tasks as they are identified and assigned.

 

Ft. Norfolk Project Showcases Suite of Services

Overview of 1810 Powder Magazine
Overview of 1810 Powder Magazine

A powder magazine was a building used to store fuses, gunpowder, and munitions, protecting them from the elements. This newly excavated powder magazine was 25 feet wide, 35 feet long, with a deep cellar.

North wall and dripline of powder magazine
North wall and dripline of powder magazine
West wall of magazine
West wall of magazine
Fort Norfolk
Fort Norfolk

Bringing together archaeology, history architecture, and GIS, our recent work at Fort Norfolk is a great example of Gray & Pape’s suite of services. Our team excavated an 1810 powder magazine, located one of the gun emplacement, performed a remote sensing survey using GPR and magnetometer, and conducted an architectural survey of the fortification and associated structures. Fort Norfolk is the last remaining of 19 harbor-front forts authorized in 1794 by President George Washington.