Contact Us

Contact Us

Cincinnati, Ohio

Cincinnati, Ohio

  • 513 287 7700
  • 513 287 7703
  • 1318 Main Street , Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Located in Cincinnati’s historic Over-the-Rhine neighborhood, our offices occupy a building built in the 1850's as two separate structures. Originally both buildings had commercial space on the first floor and residential apartments on the upper floors. From 1856 to 1920 the southern building served as one of several bakeries operating along Main Street. The northern building served the neighborhood as a hardware store for almost 100 years, from 1858-1955. The buildings were combined around 1956 and used as a clothing store until 1971. The building stood mostly vacant for the next 20 years, until occupied for its current use in 1991.
Houston, Texas

Houston, Texas

  • 713 541 0473
  • 713 541 0479
  • 110 Avondale Street, Houston, Texas 77006
Gray & Pape’s Houston office is a Neoclassical two-story building constructed in 1909 for John and Florida Bishop. Located in what is now the Avondale East Historic District, the area is part of an early 20th century affluent Houston community once home to many of Houston’s early business and social leaders including Ross Sterling – founder of Humble Oil and a former Texas Governor.
Indianapolis, Indiana

Indianapolis, Indiana

  • 317 541 8200
  • 317 541 8228
  • 5807 N Post Road, Indianapolis, Indiana 46216
The Indiana office is located in Harrison Quarters, a former non-commissioned officers quarters, built in 1908 and part U.S. Army outpost Ft. Benjamin Harrison. Decommissioned in 1994 and closed in 1996, Ft. Benjamin Harrison was redeveloped shortly thereafter as residential housing, office space, and parkland.
Providence, Rhode Island

Providence, Rhode Island

  • 401 273 9900
  • 401 273 9944
  • The Plant, 60 Valley Street Suite 103, Providence, Rhode Island 02909

The complex of buildings at 60 Valley Street is made up of conjoined buildings built during different time periods over more than 200 years. In 1773, Christopher Olney, operator of the Rising Sun Paper Mill, constructed a one story building for use as a paper mill, calling it the Brown George. After several different owners, the Brown George became part of the Providence Bleaching Dyeing and Calendaring Company (PBD&C) in 1845.

Many improvements and expansions were made in phases to the buildings and surrounding land to modernize the plant between 1845 and 1918. A three story building parallel to the bleach house was constructed for bleaching, packing, and storage. By 1900 the two buildings were combined into one and between 1843 and 1888 several modifications and additions expanded the operations of PDB&C. The mill continued its operations into the 20th Century, eventually specializing in fast color vat dyeing of cotton fabrics and the finishing of heavyweight fabrics. After World War II, the company equipped the plant for dyeing and finishing synthetic materials. During the next few years, the company was unable to secure a profitable market and was eventually liquidated in 1952 after 137 years of operation.
Richmond, Virginia

Richmond, Virginia

  • 804 644 0656
  • 2005 East Franklin Street Suite 2, Richmond, Virginia 23223
Gray & Pape’s Richmond office is located within the residential and commercial complex associated with the Old Stone Row at Shockoe Valley Heights development at the corner of East Franklin and North 21st Streets. Situated in what is now the Shockoe Valley and Tobacco Row Historic District, the office vicinity is one of the earliest focal points of historic settlement within the City of Richmond. Following the relocation of Virginia’s capital from Williamsburg to Richmond in 1780, the Shockoe Valley area grew quickly in order to accommodate the rapidly expanding tobacco trade market. The processing of tobacco within central Virginia from field to market reached its height in the 1840s, with a local Richmond newspaper describing one of larger storage warehouses as being 2.5 acres in size.  The neighborhoods surrounding these warehouse structures contained a diverse mix of commercial enterprises including a public marketplace, numerous taverns, shops, and hotels. Today, while many of the remaining tobacco warehouse structures have been repurposed for residential living, the Shockoe Valley neighborhood retains its busy commercial setting.